Caveat: GDC enters chrysalis

I finished cleaning the GDC (RV) today. To the extent I’m going to get that done, anyway – not perfectly pristine, but the best I can manage for now.

The vehicle was placed in what is to be its medium-term parking spot, down on the house-pad Richard helped create.

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An aside: I suppose that that picture above could have been my daily tree picture, too. But that particular tall tree has been featured as a daily tree before, so I decided not to do that.

And then I wrapped the GDC in a giant tarp.

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Meanwhile Arthur got his boat rinsed off and stored into the boatshed. So we had a productive day of vehicle-storing.

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Caveat: they are all cutten down

What I’m listening to right now.

Loreena McKennitt, “Bonny Portmore.” This song is not her composition, however – it’s a traditional Irish folk song, linked to a fallen oak tree at Lough Portmore, Country Antrim.

Lyrics.

O bonny Portmore, I am sorry to see
Such a woeful destruction of your ornament tree
For it stood on your shore for many’s the long day
Till the long boats from Antrim came to float it away.

O bonny Portmore, you shine where you stand
And the more I think on you the more I think long
If I had you now as I had once before
All the lords in Old England would not purchase Portmore.

All the birds in the forest they bitterly weep
Saying, “Where will we shelter or shall we sleep?”
For the Oak and the Ash, they are all cutten down
And the walls of bonny Portmore are all down to the ground.

O bonny Portmore, you shine where you stand
And the more I think on you the more I think long
If I had you now as I had once before
All the Lords of Old England would not purchase Portmore.

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Caveat: Mole in the Pueblan Style

When I was with Michelle, I often made mole poblano – the classic “chocolate chicken” in the old Aztec style. It was one of her favorites.

That was in the 1990s, of course. The last time I made it, I think, was maybe 2006. I never thought to make it since coming here to stay with Arthur because he had declared a preemptive disinterest in such an “abomination of good chocolate.” However, our friend Jan expressed interest in it, when it came up in conversation, so she convinced me to give it a try. I successfully resurrected my old recipe. I’m sure it’s not exactly the same as how I used to make it, but when I taste-tested it I could reasonably declare it “at least as good as restaurant style.”

I was surprised to learn that Arthur had no blender. I find it hard to believe, given his plethora of gadgets of all kind. So I broke out my low tech “pre-war Korean blender” (AKA stone mortar and pestle).  It gave my mole an authentic Aztec flair. The picture shows the work in progress.

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The completed sauce is below.

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Caveat: Cake for Cake’s Sake

Arthur, on his own initiative, ordered a birthday cake for Juli. The thing is, Juli isn’t here – she’s down in Portland. I believe Arthur was mostly looking for an excuse to have some more chocolate cake, in the wake of the one we bought and ordered for our respective birthdays last month.

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Anyway, in fact, Juli’s birthday not until two weeks from now. But we celebrated anyway.


Earlier we went into town for our Thursday shopping day. And we picked up the boat from where it was being serviced at the boat shop. Arthur surprised me, because as we were going to the boat launch area to put the boat in the water, out of the blue he said, so do you want to drive the boat back, or the car?

Our standard division of labor on these ventures has always been that Arthur drives the boat, while I drive the car. I couldn’t quite figure out the motivation behind this offer, but I often have found that when Arthur offers for me to do something that is normally his remit, it’s because he wants me to. So I took it to mean that he preferred that I drive the boat. So for the first time ever, I drove the boat alone, while Arthur drove the Blueberry home.

I did OK. I’m not as good as Arthur at backing the boat up – which I had to do when departing the boat launch. So it got a bit hairy when I was trying to go around another boat parked at the boat launch. But once on open water, I made my way home without incident. It was quite windy and choppy, this afternoon, on the open bay between Craig Harbor and the entrance to Port Saint Nicholas. Perhaps that’s why Arthur wanted me to drive the boat? I even managed to land and tie up the boat alone, at the dock at home, in a quite gusty east wind.


What I’m listening to right now.

Cake, “Comfort Eagle.”

Lyrics.

We are building a religion
We are building it bigger
We are widening the corridors
And adding more lanes

We are building a religion
A limited edition
We are now accepting callers
For these pendant key chains

To resist it is useless
It is useless to resist it
His cigarette is burning
But he never seems to ash

He is grooming his poodle
He is living comfort eagle
You can meet at his location
But you’d better come with cash

Now his hat is on backwards
He can show you his tattoos
He is in the music business
He is calling you “DUDE!”

Now today is tomorrow
And tomorrow today
And yesterday is weaving in and out

And the fluffy white lines
That the airplane leaves behind
Are drifting right in front
Of the waning of the moon

He is handling the money
He is serving the food
He knows about your party
He is calling you “DUDE!”

Now do you believe
In the one big sign
The double wide shine
On the boot heels of your prime

Doesn’t matter if you’re skinny
Doesn’t matter if you’re fat
You can dress up like a sultan
In your onion head hat

We are building a religion
We are making a brand
We’re the only ones to turn to
When your castles turn to sand

Take a bite of this apple
Mr. corporate events
Take a walk through the jungle
Of cardboard shanties and tents

Some people drink Pepsi
Some people drink Coke
The wacky morning DJ
Says democracy’s a joke

He says now do you believe
In the one big song
He’s now accepting callers
Who would like to sing along

He says, do you believe
In the one true edge
By fastening your safety belts
And stepping towards the ledge

He is handling the money
He is serving the food
He is now accepting callers
He is calling me “DUDE!”

He says now do you believe
In the one big sign
The double wide shine
On the boot heels of your prime

There’s no need to ask directions
If you ever lose your mind
We’re behind you
We’re behind you
And let us please remind you
We can send a car to find you
If you ever lose your way

We are building a religion

We are building it bigger

We are building

A religion

A limited

Edition

We are now accepting callers
For these beautiful
Pendant key chains

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Caveat: GDC-wash

I have been working on winterizing the GDC. GDC is the name of the RV/camper that my friends Mark and Amy brought. It stands for “God Damn Camper.” That’s Amy’s humor. I decided to keep the name.

I got the water system flushed out, and decided to clean the vehicle before putting a tarp over it and parking it on Lot 73.

It is very dirty.

I made some progress, but it was chilly and drizzly and I lost momentum around 1:30 in the afternoon. The sun is sinking fast as the equinox recedes into the past, and it now disappears behind the mountain at around 2PM.

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Caveat: Tree #279

Today, Arthur and I took the boat in for its annual service (Arthur calls it “winterizing” but that’s not quite accurate – nothing will be different about the boat once the service is complete, vis-a-vis its adaptability to the climate).

We put the boat trailer on the Blueberry (the car). I drove that into town, while Arthur drove the boat into town. Arthur took his time getting to town, this time – normally this “race” takes each of us almost the exact same amount of time, but this time Arthur took an extra 20 minutes to get there. Apparently he took a slight wrong turn at Cemetery Island.

We pulled the boat out of the water at the public boat ramp down by the fuel dock (north end of town), and drove it to the boat store for its service. I took a picture of the boat on its trailer at the boat shop, with an accompanying tree, to meet my tree-photographing obligation.

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picture[daily log: walking, 2.5km]

Caveat: On Democracy’s Spiral

Sometimes I have essentially decontextualized insights and I decide to write them down. I was reading some blog about current political events, and thought the following. It’s not a reasoned argument, just an idea that occurred to me.

In a true democracy, it seems to me that the things people believe about government will eventually become true about government. If people believe their government is dangerous, the government will become more and more dangerous over time. If people believe their government is corrupt, the government will become more and more corrupt over time. This can go the other direction too, though: if people believe their government is capable of solving social ills, then more and more social ills will be solved by government over time. If people believe their government is a virtuous protector of individual rights, then the government will become more and more virtuous in this way over time. There is a most disturbing aspect of this “spiral effect” of democracy, however: if people specifically come to believe their government is undemocratic, then the government will become less and less democratic over time. And the problem, there, unlike any of the other spirals, is that there is no way to spiral out from this problem once you’ve descended, because once the government is no longer democratic, this feedback process is no longer in effect. Thus the absolute most important belief for the nurturing and sustenance of a democracy is the belief in democracy itself.