Caveat: Now with more dumptruck!

…This here blog, now with more dumptruck than ever before.

I have been working with Richard while he installs the drain field for the new septic system. I spend a lot of time moving sand and gravel around in a big pit he made with his excavator. I also have developed some small degree of competency with connecting lengths of PVC pipe. Richard drives his dumptruck to fetch more gravel and returns.

picture

Here is progress on the drainfield. It is now buried.

picture

picture

picture

Caveat: Joe Island

There is a neighbor down the road named Joe. He has been very helpful and friendly with Arthur at various times, and they have gone fishing together in the past. We had given him a standing invitation to come out fishing with us sometime, and finally he did yesterday. We went out early (departing before 7), and we had some luck at Port Estrella, southwest of here. We didn’t catch halibut, and the salmon remain nonexistant (probably due to drought), but we found a lot of bottom fish – rock fish and such. I think they are ugly fish but they make good soup.

Near Port Estrella there is a small island called Joe Island. Joe is of course pleased to have this island named as he is. Here is Joe in front of Joe Island.

picture

Here is a view of Port Estrella as we were heading out again.

picture

Caveat: Tree #183

This tree is at the top of Jeongbal Hill, a few blocks from my apartment in Ilsan, Goyang, South Korea. It’s on the way when walking “through the park” from the National Cancer Center and my apartment. I took this picture in July, 2013, a few days after my discharge from the hospital. I walked past it (among many trees in that park) many times during my treatment at the Cancer Center.

picture

[daily log: walking, 2.5km]

Caveat: 6 Years Cancer Free

On July 4th, 2013, I had surgery to remove a stage 3 golf-ball sized tumor from the root of my tongue, at the 국민암센터 (National Cancer Center) hospital in Goyang, Korea. The surgery also removed some lymphs from my neck. I subsequently spent 23 days in the hospital, and continued daily visits through October, undergoing radiation therapy.

Up until last year (2018), I continued living in Korea. Then, last summer, I moved back to the US, to Southeast Alaska. I feel that my life has undergone huge changes this past year – almost as huge as those wrought by the cancer itself.

Regardless, much to my surprise, I remain alive. And I keep adding things to this here blog thingy.

Here is a picture of me from July 4, 2013 (I am in the ICU after my surgery).

picture

Just for contrast, here is a picture of me that I took yesterday, at Craig Seaplane Base, looking out toward Wadleigh Island.

picture

Bear in mind July 4 is not a holiday in Korea, just a regular day – that’s how my cancerversary falls on a US holiday. Frankly, this makes the holiday much more significant to me personally than it ever was before.

Caveat: What?

Arthur returned from his 36 hour sojourn in Anchorage, where he got fitted with his new hearing aids.

His first comment on the topic, was that the turn-signal blinker on the Tahoe was awfully loud. So I guess the hearing aids are working.

Here is his plane landing at Craig harbor, just as it first touched the water.

picture