Caveat: Eleven Salmon

Arthur and I went out fishing today. Wayne didn’t come along – he’s actually more of a river fisherman and I think maybe Wayne was burned out on dealing with Arthur and me and the tension on the boat that arises due to Arthur getting upset that I can’t read his mind but I’m nevertheless supposed to be effective as second-in-command.

But we have our rhythms, I guess. And we finally caught some fish. Maybe because finally it has been raining a bit, and finally the fish decided to taste the shores.

Here is a view of where the fish were, south side of San Ignacio – to the right, from here, is the open sea, but it’s a ways down. There were broad swells but it wasn’t too windy.

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Here is a view of Sunnahae – the mountain that towers over Craig – on the way back.

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Caveat: Bear #2

Arthur and Wayne failed to catch fish up at the north end of the island, where they’d gone off to yesterday. So they came back early. I guess the fishing season just isn’t going well, this year. Wayne said some people were catching fish, but using a brute force “snagging” method that is illegal in most parts of North America, but which is allowed in libertarian Alaska. It made him uncomfortable. He remarked that fishing like that in British Columbia – his home – that method would land you in jail.

So they came back. We were sitting in the upstairs living room area after dinner, and I looked up out the front door window and saw a bear in the driveway. I went out and managed a low-quality photo of it as it ambled toward the water cistern.

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Caveat: Sad and Free

I made a decision to not accompany Wayne and Arthur on the planned fishing trip up to Whale Pass. I feel a bit bad about it – like I kind of dumped Arthur on Wayne. But I was just feeling overwhelmed and burned out. I did talk with Wayne some – I said that I think Arthur was being more judgemental with me and less patient in general, during Wayne’s visit – because he feels pressure to be a good “host” and all that BS.

Anyway. I’m sitting alone at the house here at Rockpit, and with no car, either. And they’re off fishing up north.

So I’ll see what happens.



Black Box, “Everybody, Everybody.” This is from 1990, and the origins of the “house” musical genre.

Lyrics.

Everybody, everybody
Everybody, everybody
Everybody, everybody
Everybody, everybody
Everybody, everybody
Everybody, everybody
Everybody, everybody
Everybody, everybody
Everybody, everybody
Everybody, everybody
You won’t belong to me, I let you down
I walk around and see your night skyline
I feel the light but you don’t want to stay
So lonely now, just let me off downtown
Sad and free, sad and free
Sad and free, sad and free
When I said, it was over you aimed at my heart
Won’t be long for I’m leavin, all my love
But I’ll feel it forever, no sound’s in my life
You can call that no livin, on my own so free
Everybody, everybody
Everybody, everybody
Everybody, everybody
Everybody, everybody
Everybody, everybody
Everybody, everybody
Everybody, everybody
Everybody, . . .

Caveat: Tree #196

Another difficult day. Sometimes I feel as if Arthur spends half of his time cussing at his frustration with whatever current shortcoming he’s struggling with, and the other half of his time telling me in what way I’m screwing up. And so it goes.

A tree can be seen, reflected in the water at lowish tide, as we prepared to go out fishing in the boat. Arthur didn’t tell Wayne or me about his intentions – we noticed he had the motor running on the boat and was ready to go.

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[daily log: walking, 2.5km]

Caveat: Tree #195

Today was a stressful day. It involved going out with two older men in a boat fishing, but neither of those men listen to me or each other. Everyone giving instruction, no one receiving instruction. Well – it was “too many cooks in the kitchen,” but involving navigating a boat in rain and fairly strong winds.

I saw this tree by the pond on a short walk, later.

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Other pictures…

Boat window:

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The road:

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A red-leafed plant:

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[daily log: walking, 3km]

Caveat: One king

Wayne, Arthur, and I went out fishing today. It was the longest fishing excursion I’ve been on with Arthur – we left early and got back well after 3 pm. Arthur normally does a half-day excursion, so this was a long day. We could tell he was exhausted.

Arthur managed to catch one king salmon. We were at Ulitka Bay, on the northwest tip of Noyes Island.

There were a lot of boats there: you can see them in this picture.

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Here is the fish.

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Here is the view from where the fish was caught.

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We also got two other smaller fish, sea bass I think. When we got back, we prepared to cut them up. Arthur was grumpy despite having caught a fish, I think because he was tired.

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Later, we cooked some of the salmon and ate it.

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The rest of the fish was vacuum-packed and put in the freezer.

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Caveat: Tree #189

This tree is more sideways than your average tree. That’s because Richard knocked it down with his excavator.

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I believe that Richard opposes trees as a matter of principle. In this way, he is a true Alaskan. But things happen, right? I had given him permission to knock the tree down – it was in the way of some work he’s doing leveling the spot where a future house might go on Lot 73.

[daily log: walking, 2km]

Caveat: Now with more dumptruck!

…This here blog, now with more dumptruck than ever before.

I have been working with Richard while he installs the drain field for the new septic system. I spend a lot of time moving sand and gravel around in a big pit he made with his excavator. I also have developed some small degree of competency with connecting lengths of PVC pipe. Richard drives his dumptruck to fetch more gravel and returns.

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Here is progress on the drainfield. It is now buried.

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Caveat: Joe Island

There is a neighbor down the road named Joe. He has been very helpful and friendly with Arthur at various times, and they have gone fishing together in the past. We had given him a standing invitation to come out fishing with us sometime, and finally he did yesterday. We went out early (departing before 7), and we had some luck at Port Estrella, southwest of here. We didn’t catch halibut, and the salmon remain nonexistant (probably due to drought), but we found a lot of bottom fish – rock fish and such. I think they are ugly fish but they make good soup.

Near Port Estrella there is a small island called Joe Island. Joe is of course pleased to have this island named as he is. Here is Joe in front of Joe Island.

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Here is a view of Port Estrella as we were heading out again.

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Caveat: Tree #183

This tree is at the top of Jeongbal Hill, a few blocks from my apartment in Ilsan, Goyang, South Korea. It’s on the way when walking “through the park” from the National Cancer Center and my apartment. I took this picture in July, 2013, a few days after my discharge from the hospital. I walked past it (among many trees in that park) many times during my treatment at the Cancer Center.

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[daily log: walking, 2.5km]

Caveat: 6 Years Cancer Free

On July 4th, 2013, I had surgery to remove a stage 3 golf-ball sized tumor from the root of my tongue, at the 국민암센터 (National Cancer Center) hospital in Goyang, Korea. The surgery also removed some lymphs from my neck. I subsequently spent 23 days in the hospital, and continued daily visits through October, undergoing radiation therapy.

Up until last year (2018), I continued living in Korea. Then, last summer, I moved back to the US, to Southeast Alaska. I feel that my life has undergone huge changes this past year – almost as huge as those wrought by the cancer itself.

Regardless, much to my surprise, I remain alive. And I keep adding things to this here blog thingy.

Here is a picture of me from July 4, 2013 (I am in the ICU after my surgery).

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Just for contrast, here is a picture of me that I took yesterday, at Craig Seaplane Base, looking out toward Wadleigh Island.

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Bear in mind July 4 is not a holiday in Korea, just a regular day – that’s how my cancerversary falls on a US holiday. Frankly, this makes the holiday much more significant to me personally than it ever was before.

Caveat: What?

Arthur returned from his 36 hour sojourn in Anchorage, where he got fitted with his new hearing aids.

His first comment on the topic, was that the turn-signal blinker on the Tahoe was awfully loud. So I guess the hearing aids are working.

Here is his plane landing at Craig harbor, just as it first touched the water.

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Caveat: Sand over mud

Firstly, Arthur went to Anchorage. He has to see the VA about his new hearing aids, and they decided, in their infinite wisdom, that this should be at their Anchorage location. I’m a bit frustrated with how this has progressed: it seems to me that Arthur could have used the opportunity at being at a large, well-staffed and equipped VA hospital in Anchorage to have taken an extra day or two and set up some appointments to look at his various other issues – the vertigo, the still-sore neck, etc. He will have none of it. Sigh. So he’ll be back tomorrow.

Meanwhile, Richard elected this morning to begin work on our new septic tank for lot 73. I spent the day helping him. Digging in mud, and packing down a layer of sand for the floor of the septic drain field.

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It was hard work, but more-or-less satisfying.

 

Caveat: Done & Stung

I finished the “first draft” version of the well-head shed (doghouse). I call it a first draft, because I need to buy some supplies (electrical and plumbing) to now reconfigure the inside, now that I know how the pump works and what’s needed, so that the whole system is “hook up ready.”

I also need to get some proper fasteners for the scraps of metal siding I’ve used (which I found in a pile down by one of Arthur’s sheds).

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Only 5 minutes after taking this picture, as I carried some of the tools I’d been using down to the house, I got stung by a bee (or yellowjacket?). I don’t think I’ve been stung by a bee in at least a decade. I’m sure I was never stung during my sojourn in Korea.

So now I’m just resting. I’ve never had a severe reaction to beestings, but it does swell up. This sting was on my collarbone – I think the bee got caught in my shirt somehow without my noticing.

Ow.