Caveat: GDC Day

Once a month, I should go over and start up the GDC (the RV), to make sure it’s still functional under its cocoon (tarp). I ran the engine, generator and heater for an hour, with the tarp partly lifted away so as to not poison myself with carbon monoxide. Everything still works. While it was running, I went on walk up the hillside to my neglected treehouse site and maintained my trails a bit.

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Caveat: Tree #311

The neighbor, whose house burned down in August, apparently got some insurance money, and is rebuilding. He’s hired someone to put in an improved driveway and a new house-pad, higher than the old house. I’m a bit skeptical in the way this new project has overflowed onto the tribal lands to his east – his new driveway cuts off from the road almost a 100 feet east of his property line. But the new driveway does afford a nice view of the charred but still-living tree down by the water-line where the old house was.

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Here is a view of the new house-pad down the old stairs, the lower part of which we had to destroy with the chain saw during the night of the fire, to prevent the fire from spreading up the stairs.

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picture[daily log: walking, 2.5km]

Caveat: Tree #309

Arthur and I went into town shopping – it’s shopping Thursday, one of our fixed traditions these days.

It rained continuously. We stopped by Jan’s office at the VFW – which we often do. She used an adjective to describe her husband Richard’s efforts in adding a carport to their house, which we’d seen driving past: “Trojanesque” (this is derived from their last name). I laughed quite a bit – Richard’s construction efforts do, indeed, have a quite distinct style, and I felt the adjective captured this quite well. I’ll have to see if I can come up with some kind of objective definition for this word, which has an obvious, intuitive meaning to anyone who is familiar with Richard’s work. Perhaps related to a kind of grandiose disregard for the conventions of design, without being for that at all incompetent?

The small tree grows on the hump of the log of a long-dead big tree.

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picture[daily log: walking, 2km]

Caveat: Tree #306

Studying psychology for one of my exams-for-credit that I’ll take next month, I’m struck by how much of it is really just vocabulary – a certain way of talking about things.

This is an archival tree. Specifically, I saw this tree while lying on a bench at a buddhist monastery in northern Illinois, December, 2009.

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picture[daily log: walking, 2km]